Most of our staff will be working remotely due to COVID 19. We are continuing to fulfill & ship orders at this time. When calling please leave a voicemail with name phone & details. Our sales team or appropriate contact will respond to your inquiry as soon as possible.

Cannabinoids & Terpenes

CANNABINOIDS

Cannabinoids are a class of diverse chemical compounds that act on the cannabinoid receptors, which are part of the endocannabinoid system. These receptor proteins include the endocannabinoids produced naturally in the body, as well as the phytocannabinoids, found in cannabis. Phytocannabinoids are naturally occurring compounds found in the trichomes (resin glands) of the Cannabis sativa species. There are at least 113 different phytocannabinoids isolated from cannabis, their ability to interact directly with cannabinoid receptors located throughout the central nervous system, allows for a wide range of therapeutic potential1 .

TERPENES

Terpenes are a large and diverse group of organic compounds produced by a variety of plants, particularly conifers2 . Plants with terpenes often have a strong odor, thought to be used as a deterrent against being consumed by herbivores3 . Research and interest in cannabis-based terpenes has grown since they are known to contribute & complement the physiological effects of cannabis. Some research has suggested that they are most effective when working together with cannabinoids - resulting in the entourage effect4 . Therefore, terpenes may play an equally important role when it comes to studying the vast amount of therapeutic potential of the Cannabis sativa plant.

 

REFERENCES 1. Zou, S. (2018, Mar). Cannabinoid Receptors and the Endocannabinoid System: Signaling and Function in the Central Nervous System. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 19(3): 833. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5877694/ 2. Breitmaier, E., Terpenes: Flavors, Fragrances, Pharmaca, Pheromones. 2006: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co KGaA. 3. Martin, D.M., J. Gershenzon, and J. Bohlmann, Induction of volatile terpene biosynthesis and diurnal emission by methyl jasmonate in foliage of Norway spruce. Plant Physiol, 2003. 132(3): p. 1586-99. 4. Russo, E. B. (2011, Aug). Taming THC: potential cannabis synergy and phytoc

 

 

Cannabinoids

Compound

Part Number

Cannabidiol

ASB-00001454-010

Cannabidivarin

ASB-00001453-005

 

Terpenes

Compound

Part Number

(-)-a-Bisabolol

ASB-00002292-001

α-Pinene

ASB-00016836-001

Borneol

ASB-00002356-001

β-Caryophyllene

ASB-00003250-001

Geraniol

ASB-00007150-001

α-Humulene

ASB-00008333-001

Terpinolene

ASB-00020106-001

Valencene

ASB-00022050-001

Menthol

ASB-00013968-001

Nerolidol

ASB-00014293-001

Carmphene

ASB-00003078-001

Cineole/Eucalyptol

ASB-00005375-001

(-)-a-Cedrene

ASB-00003332-100

Camphor

ASB-00003077-001

Isopulegol

ASB-00009500-100

Sabinene Hydrate

ASB-00019002-100

α-Terpinene

ASB-00020100-001

y-Terpinene

ASB-00020101-001

Linalool

ASB-00012220-001

Mycrene

ASB-00013918-001

Caryophyllene Oxide

ASB-00003251-100

α-Terpineol

ASB-00020105-001

(R)-(+)-Pulegone

ASB-00016405-100

Geranyl acetate

ASB-00007152-100

Citronellol

ASB-00003668-100

p-Cymene

ASB-00003987-001

Guaiol

ASB-00007078-010

Isoborneol

ASB-00009195-001

trans(-)-Caryophyllene

ASB-00003250-001

trans-β-Farnesene

ASB-00006002-001

Nerol

ASB-00014290-001

 

Download the pdf:

Cannabinoids and Terpenes

Subscribe